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 Care Campaign For The Vulnerable

Care Campaign for the Vulnerable is learning of the pressures faced by conscientious led Care Providers striving to offer a caring and safe environment to both service users and staff. Safety monitoring is proving to be a invaluable care assist tool - bringing a more open and transparent culture into care homes as well as saving valuable resources within the care home sector and the NHS

Case Studies

“No protection for whistleblowers means no protection for our most vulnerable residents”...Senior Care Manager.

Added on 20th September 2020

A senior care manager contacted Care Campaign for the Vulnerable saying staff needed better protection and whistleblowing policies to protect those who speak out about poor care practice.

. “Staff are too dependent on their jobs to speak out. Staff who are made an example of for speaking out (lack of confidentiality) and Subtle changes to how they’re treated etc. I think each organisation should have a freedom to speak out champion who is themselves protected and leaders have to listen. With 30 years of nursing under my belt I’m tired of the fight." Senior Care Manager.

"I first whistleblew about ten years ago. I was working as a home manager and in my first month I checked the residents personal monies held by the home and found one lady was three hundred and forty pounds light in her account. She was walking round in slippers with holes in and wanted to attend her brothers funeral but was distressed at not having appropriate footwear. I bought her some cozy feet shoes myself.I told the owner who corrected the deficit and then warned me from reporting this to anyone. I’d only been there a month. I left and reported them. They simply didn’t pay me my months salary.

I worked elsewhere and had a good career trajectory meaning I reported to the board. I reported to the CEO that we needed to close a home as the care was appalling. He shouted me down. He reduced staffing and then when CQC closed the home he blamed one of the operations managers for not reporting the issues. I left on principle. Supported the OM and reported the company.

"It’s easy for the CEO to direct blame at someone else... "

CQC don’t generally get a full picture. They only speak with those people still employed and never, in my opinion, complete a full 360 degree investigation. To understand the triumphs and failings of an organisation you need to see everything. At the end of the day we care for some of the most vulnerable people in society. Human beings. Someone’s mum, dad, brother or sister. No one ever looks forward to going in to a care home and it’s our duty to protect and care for them when they are there. Trying to do the right thing is actually more challenging than keeping your head down and carrying on.

Nobody likes a whistleblower. A whistleblower is tarnished with a troublemaker moniker, a snitch. Someone who people need to avoid. Companies ‘talk the talk’ about wanting people to speak out but don’t ‘walk the walk’ when they do. It’s a soul destroying place to be.

I gave up on management and decided I would work as a nurse where I could give the care I wanted to. It’s an interesting place being this side of the fence.

At the height of COVID-19 I did a month in a home. I always think it’s ok but then when I start to get in to the role the staff talk to me (I’m quite chatty) and suddenly all their troubles and worries about practices flood out. I can’t and won’t keep my mouth shut. I wrote to the manager, he ignored me so I contacted CQC. The organisation was hostile. Things did change though.

Most recently I worked in a small home that is rated outstanding. They don’t do anything by the rules. The home managers daughter is a night nurse. A very protected nurse. So much has happened. I sent in my concerns with the regret that I could no longer work there. The home manager actually asked me how I thought she felt after receiving my resignation? Not because I had resigned but because I had raised concerns about her daughters practise. I was astonished. Not once was I asked to give more background to my concerns. This outstanding home now has no day nurses so two of the senior carers don navy uniforms and are referred to as ‘the nurse.’ They get around the nurse issue by having the manager in the building. She rarely has patient contact. Never oversees the drug round or written report.... they exploit every loop hole and because of Covid responsive inspections are less of a reality. CQC are more likely to simply ask the provider for evidence rather than inspect in person.

I’ve been a nurse for 30 years. My focus has mainly been on elderly care. My grandparents were a big influence in my formative years and I have an affinity with the elderly. The social care sector has so many heroes working in it. People who genuinely care and love their jobs. Sadly it is corrupt too. Having to financially achieve seems to come way before delivering great care. There is no protection for whistleblowers. Once you’ve spoken out a whistleblower is truly at the mercy of the organisation they’ve disclosed about. Everyone needs a reference.

I’ve shared this with Care Campaign for the Vulnerable because I feel your passion. I really wish I could put everything right and fix it all but I can’t. I don’t think I want to be a nurse anymore. So many people have forgotten that the most important person in their care home is the patient.

The care industry needs real life support system for whistleblowers. No one (no matter what they say) actually has this. Perhaps fundraise for a national whistleblowers helpline. If the organisations really support their staff then they could help fund this. A national one for everyone in social care not one affiliated to a particular company as that doesn’t boost confidence."

Manager's name withheld. If you have an interest in this case study please send details to Ccftv.cares@gmail.com

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Our Director's statement to why Care Campaign for the Vulnerable was set up.

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Report from Marbrook Centre in Cambridge on the benefits to safety monitoring in communal areas for residents and staff.

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Dominic Grieve Westminster Speech 2018 on Care Campaign For The Vulnerable Safety Monitoring In Care Homes

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Care Campaign Government Proposal

"The evidence from Providers who have installed CCTV seems to me to merit careful attention and to be quite persuasive"

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Just some of the Care Providers who support our CCTV Safety Monitoring in Care Homes

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Safe Place Scheme

Chiltern and South Bucks District Council SAFE PLACE SCHEME has called on Care Campaign for the Vulnerable to add our support to the initiative for those who are vulnerable in the community to get help if out and about and feeling scared , lost or confused.

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Care Campaign for the Vulnerable is learning of the pressures faced by conscientious led Care Providers striving to offer a caring and safe environment to both service users and staff. Safety monitoring is proving to be a invaluable care assist tool - bringing a more open and transparent culture into care homes as well as saving valuable resources within the care home sector and the NHS

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