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 Care Campaign For The Vulnerable

Care Campaign for the Vulnerable is learning of the pressures faced by conscientious led Care Providers striving to offer a caring and safe environment to both service users and staff. Safety monitoring is proving to be a invaluable care assist tool - bringing a more open and transparent culture into care homes as well as saving valuable resources within the care home sector and the NHS

Case Studies

Care Campaign for the Vulnerable launches Let Loved Ones In Campaign

Added on 5th October 2020

https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/1347501/coronavirus-care-home-visits-daily-express-campaign

CCFTV LAUNCHES OUR ''LET LOVED ONES IN'' #letlovedonesin CAMPAIGN. One designated family member/care partner to be given key worker status and allowed into care homes.

#LetLovedOnesIn

CHRISTINE HASN'T HUGGED HER ELDERLY MOTHER FOR SIX MONTHS AND TOLD CCFTV THE CARE HOME HAS NOW STOPPED WINDOW VISITS


''Families are coming to us worried regarding the decline of elderly relatives. Banning a family member and not allowing them to have full contact in a care home is not a responsible action to take. Families have had enough and see Covid as not the threat any more but only seeing a downhill spiral in their loved ones emotional wellbeing.'' CARE CAMPAIGN FOR THE VULNERABLE

Care Campaign for the Vulnerable has launched our Let Loved Ones In Campaign. Our national, not for profit, safety in elderly care organisation is receiving an unprecedented high volume of correspondence from distressed families demanding to have face to face contact with loved ones in care homes after many have been separated for over six months. While we fully understand the risk and the pressure the care sector is under it is imperative we are not blindsided to what isolation and loneliness can bring to vulnerable elderly people.

Majority of elderly living in care homes do so because they have mild to severe memory problems and many living with dementia. Families tell us that they visited regularly to assist with care needs and daily activities and now seeing an emotional and physical decline when video calling. Families are reporting homes not facilitating regularly these important up to date calls and homes have now put a stop to window visits. Care Campaign For The Vulnerable launched the Let Loved Ones In campaign after families were telling us one care partner should be treated as a key worker. This government must consider elderly people in care homes and families believe loved ones now feel abandoned. This seperation is cruel and needs urgent address.

"My mum is in a care home in Glasgow and I 100% demand we have key worker status so that we will NEVER again be locked out of our family's lives. Thank you CCFTV." Karen Thompson
"I and my family support #LetLovedOnesIn Campaign. I want to hug my husband and haven't done so for nearly six months." Christina

''I would do anything just to squeeze my mum's hand''. Bee W.

"I just visited my mum today and haven't been able to get anywhere near her for seven months now. Everyone else has been able to see their loved ones as lock down has eased apart from care home residents. My mum's (and mine) mental health is now at breaking point with the separation. I can see the toll and deterioration in my mum. She has stopped communicating so window visits are useless. She is down and withdrawn and giving up rapidly. My heart has been broken into a thousand pieces and I have been robbed of precious time that I will never get back and 'now' time is of the essence. There needs to be a balance between saving lives and a person's quality of life. This is not living only existing. Please please, please, please help me push for the right to visit and hold my mum and give her the love, reassurance and comfort we both need before it's too late. Thankyou for all your help." Anna

''My mother is going into a care home. I want to join your campaign to let loved ones in care homes.'' Tina B.

"Due to random wandering we had to place our Nan in a care home just after the first lockdown. We were aware we would not be able to visit for a short time but Nans safety came first.I was a carer for Nan alongside another family member, due to this I’ve been in close contact with Nan throughout the pandemic. I made sure I kept her as safe as possible utilising PPE and sanitising regularly.

Nan's home started garden visits where 1 nominated person was allowed to visit at a 2 metre distance in a gazebo in the garden. This was better than nothing but Nan just didn’t understand why she couldn’t come close to me. I even witnessed another resident very unhappy and kicking off at being made to sit in the gazebo as he just didn’t understand what was happening. Garden visits were stopped by the home due to an increase in cases, however, during this time Nan was hospitalised with severe weight loss! Whilst in hospital I was able to visit with Nan for one hour every day with no restrictions other than wearing a mask! I was in very close contact including feeding and dressing Nan. She was discharged back to home and I’ve not been able to visit since. I do understand the severity of COVID getting in to a care home but surely our families mental well being needs to be taken into consideration too. Nan will have no idea why we’re not visiting and she really doesn’t understand much about the pandemic!

There are no other options to visit Nan face to face, I know some homes are doing window visits but Nans home doesn’t facilitate this. I’ve now tried it on two separate occasions to Skype with Nan but no one's been available to assist and today my message has been ignored. Our family members are literally deteriorating by the day and this could be avoided. They’re so vulnerable as it is and now they’re left feeling deserted by their families." Anonymous

"I am unable to see my daughter who is 32 and has Huntingtons disease, I see her through the window wich breaks my heart seeing her. She's changed so much and even worse she has an 11 year old son who can't see her. It's cruel and inhumane to keep these people locked away, I've tried everything including being tested for covid when staff looking after her hadnt been. I've even emailed prime ministers office through my local MP, but still nothing changes."Lisa K

''I continually complained about my mother’s care and eventually moved her to another home. NHS paid for the move. It was a more expensive home and I fought to get the full CHC funding for it. Sadly it was too late because she died only after the two weeks. I only had 3 hour visits in the two weeks but was with her in the end. This separation is cruel and so many carers in the home agreed.”Pauline S.

A MUCH LOVED MOTHER AND GRANDMOTHER DIED WITH NO FAMILY MEMBER PRESENT IN A CARE HOME WHEN THE PROVIDER REFUSED TO LET HER DAUGHTER CAROL GRIFFITHS IN TO SIT AND HOLD HER MOTHERS HAND DURING HER LAST MOMENTS. CAROL HAD TESTED COVID19 NEGATIVE

FAMILIES ARE CONTACTING CCFTV REPORTING MANY HOMES TOO BUSY OR NOT FACILITATING VIDEO CALLS


“It’s been eight months I've not been able to hold her hand, even when she reaches for me. Eight months I've not been able to give her a hug. The way things are going I will not be hugging her in this lifetime. We did what the Government asked of us and more. This is against humanity.'' Joy #letlovedonesin


"I have been passed your details by the manager of the care home my mum is currently living in. I want to be able to see her. She suffered from Alzheimers and was until May living at home with my dad who cared for her. She fell down the stairs at the beginning of May and was taken into hospital. From there she was transferred to to rehabilitation unit and then discharged into a care home for continuing care under Covid19 regulations. I have not been able to see her through all of this. I haven't seen her since March because of the lockdown. The care home is only following guidelines as advised by their local CCG and LA and they are in turn following guidelines set out by central government regarding visiting regulations. I completely understand we have a responsibility to both staff and residents to keep them safe but I struggle to understand why I can’t enter the care home via the nearest fire exit, ensure I socially distance from any staff and wear PPE at all time whilst on the care home grounds.

Prior to her accident my mum could walk, communicate, feed herself, tell me she loved me, give me a hug. Her accident has left her bed ridden, unable to speak and is now beginning to struggle with swallowing. The doctor will not pronounce her ‘end of life’ yet, which is currently the only way I could see her and then it would be in full PPE and for only a half hour slot. I have my life to thank for my mother, she has been one of my best friends. She is dignified, intelligent, private and fun loving. I need to see her whilst she is still here. I just want to say thank you, I love you and tell her I will tell my children all about her, I can see her in them all. It is cruel that we have been robbed of her but still crueler to know she is in some room somewhere I have never seen and can't access. She has done nothing wrong. This is against her human rights...and mine." Lizzy


''I am desperate to see my mum. She is 92 years old, blind, deaf and bed bound. I placed her in a care home on 12th March and went round the next day and the home went into lockdown. I haven't seen her since only through the window standing on a ledge trying to talk to her through a small window. She has no hearing aids on normally but I’m desperate to see her to remind her how close we were. All she eats is yoghurt and porridge so I am told she weighed 28 kilos. Not sure how much longer she will be here. They said I would be able to have an end of life visit. But it’s not good enough. I go to the care home nearly every day to try and see her - it’s breaking my heart.'' Dawn

CARE CAMPAIGN FOR THE VULNERABLE UNDERSTANDS MAJORITY OF PROVIDERS AND CARE HOMES ARE DOING ALL THEY CAN TO ASSIST FAMILIES TO KEEP IN CONTACT WITH ELDERLY RELATIVES. HOWEVER ITS REPORTED TO US THAT A MINORITY ARE NOT FACILITATING THIS IMPORTANT CONTACT AND THEREFORE CCFTV WANT TO SEE ONE DESIGNATED CARE PARTNER TO BE TREATED AS A KEY WORKER AND LET INTO CARE HOMES TO HELP CARE AND ASSIST WITH VULNERABLE ELDERLY EMOTIONAL AND CARE NEEDS. IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN JOINING US CONTACT CCFTV.CARES@GMAIL.COM

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Our Director's statement to why Care Campaign for the Vulnerable was set up.

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Report from Marbrook Centre in Cambridge on the benefits to safety monitoring in communal areas for residents and staff.

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Dominic Grieve Westminster Speech 2018 on Care Campaign For The Vulnerable Safety Monitoring In Care Homes

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Care Campaign Government Proposal

"The evidence from Providers who have installed CCTV seems to me to merit careful attention and to be quite persuasive"

Dominic Grieve MP

Just some of the Care Providers who support our CCTV Safety Monitoring in Care Homes

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Download their 'Safety Monitoring In Communal Areas in Care Homes' document

Safe Place Scheme

Chiltern and South Bucks District Council SAFE PLACE SCHEME has called on Care Campaign for the Vulnerable to add our support to the initiative for those who are vulnerable in the community to get help if out and about and feeling scared , lost or confused.

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Care Campaign for the Vulnerable is learning of the pressures faced by conscientious led Care Providers striving to offer a caring and safe environment to both service users and staff. Safety monitoring is proving to be a invaluable care assist tool - bringing a more open and transparent culture into care homes as well as saving valuable resources within the care home sector and the NHS

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