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 Care Campaign For The Vulnerable

Care Campaign for the Vulnerable is learning of the pressures faced by conscientious led Care Providers striving to offer a caring and safe environment to both service users and staff. Safety monitoring is proving to be a invaluable care assist tool - bringing a more open and transparent culture into care homes as well as saving valuable resources within the care home sector and the NHS

Case Studies

Families making video calls to loved ones is giving them cause for concern

Added on 11th June 2020

Concerned families are contacting Care Campaign for the Vulnerable telling us they now want to have face to face visits with loved ones because when making video calls they see a decline in health.
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Care Campaign for the Vulnerable is receiving an increase in calls from families concerned about loved ones when they video call. Families say loved ones look thinner and more withdrawn.

''I made a video call to my elderly dad who lives with dementia and immediately saw how unwell he looked demanding the care home call out a doctor. That afternoon the GP sent my dad to hospital battling a chest infection leading to pneumonia. Our Dad went back to the care home yesterday from the hospital. We had no choice. He was so very poorly suffering a urine and chest infection which led to pneumonia. My Dad has lost 10kg since lockdown began which leads his family to ask what level of care is he being given? I’ve only had two video calls with him because he’s forever asleep. We are so worried about him and the care home give us very little information.'' Sarah, a daughter in care


Care Campaign For The Vulnerable is calling for providers to in part relax visiting embargoes in care homes. Elderly people and their families have been separated for weeks and its now imperative that some thought is given as to how to begin to ease shielding to enable families to have some interaction with their elderly vulnerable loved ones.

We of course are acutely aware that providers are wanting to protect all vulnerable people in their care however with recent testing for both staff and residents, it is not impossible to think that residents with a negative test could participate in socially distanced visiting arrangements.

Some providers have already set up visiting areas in gardens for example that keep the resident screened from family members but allow for conversation and sight of each other. Maintaining a 2m distance rule ensures resident welfare is protected but restores much needed family interaction. Families that have been contacted by us are desperate to re-engage with loved ones knowing that their time may be limited.

For those residents unable to leave bedrooms because of frailty or illness, we urge providers to consider restricted family visits, with perhaps only the immediate next of kin and of course those individuals suitably screened and wearing PPE. It is important that families have the opportunity to now spend as much precious time together as possible and can, where possible, assist with a loved one's care.

''Before this pandemic started, I raised concerns with the care home on assisting my Dad at mealtimes, bedsores and he's in his room all day with the door closed, as well as very poor quality of food. Also concerning us, a good friend, her mother, is living in the same care home and doesn’t have dementia. She said an elderly resident fell breaking her hip and was also sent to a hospital. The families are frantic and we’ve heard nothing about face to face visitation. I know so many of us are worried about the level of care and many families previously went in to keep an eye on them.' A daughter in care

Seeing my mum on video call is just too upsetting. Not being able to visit and keep a check on her. She looks not as healthy as the last time I saw her and definately lost weight'' A daughter in care.


Some care homes are now leading the way for families to be safely reunited

'' My mother has faded away since visitations have stopped. Many elderly living with dementia probably feel abandoned, not fully understanding why we are no longer there. It's wrong families are not allowed now to slowly get back to having face to face visits and wearing PPE. My mother is at late stage dementia. This time is precious to us and it has been three months. Her care wasn't good before the lockdown. I worry constantly and sadly the home give me little reassurances just reciting 'difficult times'' A son in care.

Care Homes leading the way like Shedfield Lodge in Hampshire know how important it is for loved ones to be reunited and are now taking bookings for families to start seeing each other safely again.

CARE CAMPAIGN FOR THE VULNERABLE IS CALLING ON ALL CARE PROVIDERS TO NOW FACILITATE FACE TO FACE VISITS FOR FAMILIES WITH APPROPRIATE RISK ASSESSMENTS.

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Our Director's statement to why Care Campaign for the Vulnerable was set up.

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Report from Marbrook Centre in Cambridge on the benefits to safety monitoring in communal areas for residents and staff.

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Dominic Grieve Westminster Speech 2018 on Care Campaign For The Vulnerable Safety Monitoring In Care Homes

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Care Campaign Government Proposal

"The evidence from Providers who have installed CCTV seems to me to merit careful attention and to be quite persuasive"

Dominic Grieve MP

Just some of the Care Providers who support our CCTV Safety Monitoring in Care Homes

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Download their 'Safety Monitoring In Communal Areas in Care Homes' document

Safe Place Scheme

Chiltern and South Bucks District Council SAFE PLACE SCHEME has called on Care Campaign for the Vulnerable to add our support to the initiative for those who are vulnerable in the community to get help if out and about and feeling scared , lost or confused.

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Care Campaign for the Vulnerable is learning of the pressures faced by conscientious led Care Providers striving to offer a caring and safe environment to both service users and staff. Safety monitoring is proving to be a invaluable care assist tool - bringing a more open and transparent culture into care homes as well as saving valuable resources within the care home sector and the NHS

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